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Adrian Gonzalez
Adrian Gonzalez

How to Escape the Cops and Collect Cash in Money Run


Money Run: What It Is, Why It Happens, and How to Prevent It




A money run is a situation where a large number of people withdraw their money from a financial institution or a country because they fear that their money will lose value or become inaccessible. A money run can have serious consequences for the stability and growth of the financial system and the economy. In this article, we will explain what causes a money run, what types of money run exist, and what can be done to prevent or mitigate a money run.


Introduction




Definition of money run




A money run is a phenomenon where many people try to get their money out of a financial institution or a country at the same time. This can happen when people lose confidence in the solvency or liquidity of the institution or the country, or when they expect a devaluation or depreciation of the currency. A money run can create a self-fulfilling prophecy, as the increased demand for withdrawals can force the institution or the country to sell its assets at low prices, incur losses, or default on its obligations.




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Causes and effects of money run




A money run can be triggered by various factors, such as bad news, rumors, contagion, speculation, or panic. Some common causes of money run are:



  • Financial crises, such as bank failures, sovereign defaults, or stock market crashes



  • Macroeconomic shocks, such as recessions, inflation, or deflation



  • Political instability, such as wars, coups, or sanctions



  • Policy changes, such as capital controls, exchange rate regimes, or bailouts



A money run can have negative effects on both the institution or the country that experiences it and the rest of the financial system and the economy. Some possible effects are:



  • Liquidity shortages, as the institution or the country runs out of cash or reserves to meet the withdrawals



  • Solvency problems, as the institution or the country suffers losses or insolvency due to asset sales or defaults



  • Fire sales, as the institution or the country has to sell its assets at low prices to raise cash



  • Asset price declines, as the fire sales depress the market value of the assets



  • Credit crunches, as the institution or the country reduces its lending activity or increases its interest rates



  • Economic contraction, as the credit crunches reduce investment and consumption



  • Contagion effects, as the money run spreads to other institutions or countries that are perceived to be vulnerable



Thesis statement




In this article, we will argue that a money run is a serious threat to financial stability and economic growth, and that it can be prevented or mitigated by effective policies and practices from central banks, regulators, financial institutions, and depositors.


Types of Money Run




Bank run




A bank run is a type of money run where depositors withdraw their funds from a bank because they fear that the bank will fail or become illiquid. A bank run can occur when depositors lose trust in the bank's ability to honor its obligations, such as paying interest or returning deposits on demand. A bank run can also occur when depositors expect a devaluation of the currency in which their deposits are denominated.


Examples of bank runs




Bank runs have occurred throughout history in different countries and regions. Some well-known examples are Some well-known examples are:



  • The bank run on Northern Rock in the United Kingdom in 2007, which was sparked by the global financial crisis and the bank's exposure to subprime mortgages. The bank had to seek emergency funding from the Bank of England and was eventually nationalized by the government.



  • The bank run on Washington Mutual in the United States in 2008, which was also triggered by the global financial crisis and the bank's losses from mortgage defaults. The bank suffered a loss of $16.7 billion in deposits in 10 days and was seized by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and sold to JPMorgan Chase.



  • The bank run on Wachovia in the United States in 2008, which was another casualty of the global financial crisis and the bank's exposure to risky loans. The bank faced a loss of $5 billion in deposits in three days and was acquired by Wells Fargo with the help of the FDIC.



Currency crisis




A currency crisis is a type of money run where investors sell off a country's currency because they fear that the currency will lose value or become unconvertible. A currency crisis can occur when investors lose confidence in the country's economic fundamentals, such as its fiscal policy, monetary policy, trade balance, or external debt. A currency crisis can also occur when investors expect a change in the exchange rate regime, such as a devaluation or a revaluation.


Examples of currency crises




Currency crises have also occurred throughout history in different countries and regions. Some well-known examples are:


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  • The Latin American debt crisis in the 1980s, which affected several countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. The crisis was caused by a combination of external shocks, such as high interest rates and low commodity prices, and internal problems, such as fiscal deficits, inflation, and overvalued exchange rates. The crisis led to massive devaluations, defaults, and restructuring of foreign debt.



  • The Asian financial crisis in 1997-1998, which affected several countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, South Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines. The crisis was triggered by a sudden reversal of capital flows, as investors lost confidence in the region's economic prospects and stability. The crisis resulted in sharp depreciations, banking failures, recessions, and social unrest.



  • The Argentine economic crisis in 1999-2002, which involved a severe currency crisis and a sovereign default. The crisis was precipitated by a fixed exchange rate regime that became unsustainable due to fiscal imbalances, external shocks, and contagion effects. The crisis led to a massive devaluation, hyperinflation, social upheaval, and political turmoil.



Prevention and Mitigation of Money Run




A money run can be a devastating event for the financial system and the economy, but it can also be prevented or mitigated by effective policies and practices from different actors. Here are some of the main ways to avoid or reduce the impact of a money run:


Role of central banks and regulators




Central banks and regulators play a crucial role in maintaining financial stability and preventing money runs. Some of their functions are:



  • Lender of last resort: Central banks can provide emergency liquidity to financial institutions or countries that face a money run, by lending them money at a low interest rate or buying their assets. This can help restore confidence and prevent a liquidity crisis from becoming a solvency crisis.



  • Monetary policy: Central banks can use monetary policy tools, such as interest rates, reserve requirements, or quantitative easing, to influence the money supply and the exchange rate. This can help stabilize the economy, control inflation, and support the value of the currency.



  • Financial regulation: Regulators can impose rules and standards on financial institutions, such as capital adequacy, liquidity ratios, disclosure requirements, or stress tests. This can help ensure that financial institutions are sound, transparent, and resilient to shocks.



  • Financial supervision: Regulators can monitor and oversee the activities and performance of financial institutions, such as banks, insurance companies, or securities firms. This can help detect and correct any problems or risks that may arise in the financial system.





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